Plant Words

Here are some of Susan's favorite garden quotations.


   
It will never rain roses. When we want more roses, we must plant more trees.
—George Eliot

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One of the worst mistakes you can make as a gardener is to think you're in charge.
—Janet Gillespie

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I want death to find me planting my cabbages.
—Michel de Montaigne

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A garden is a thing of beauty and a job forever.
—Richard Briers

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No two gardens are the same. No two days are the same in one garden.
—Hugh Johnson

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Begin early. But it's never too late to start.
—Emilie Barnes

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Grow what you love. The love will keep it growing.
—Emilie Barnes

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The garden that is finished is dead.
—H. E. Bates

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What if you have seen it before, ten thousand times over? An apple tree in full blossom is like a message, sent fresh from heaven to earth, of purity and beauty.
—Henry Ward Beecher

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A gardener learns more in the mistakes than in the successes.
—Barbara Dodge Borland

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Autumn arrives in the early morning, but spring at the close of a winter day.
—Elizabeth Bowen

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There are several ways to lay out a little garden; the best way is to get a gardener.
—Karel Capek

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A garden is the interface between the house and the rest of civilization.
—Geoffrey Charlesworth

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If seeds in the black earth can turn into such beautiful roses, what might not the heart of man become in its long journey toward the stars?
—G. K. Chesterton

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What a pother have authors made with Roses! What a racket have they kept!
—Nicholas Culpeper (1653)

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When smiling lawns and tasteful cottages begin to embellish a country, we know that order and culture are established.
—Andrew Jackson Downing

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There is simply the rose; it is perfect in every moment of its existence.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

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My garden is an honest place. Every tree and every vine are incapable of concealment, and tell after two or three months exactly what sort of treatment they have had.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson

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And I beseech you, forget not to informe yourselfe as dilligently as may be, in things that belong to gardening.
—John Evelyn (1706)

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But each spring...a gardening instinct, sore as the sap rising in the trees, stirs within us. We look about and decide to tame another little bit of ground.
—Lewis Gannett

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Bees are very fond of Horehound nectar, and the honey they make from the flowers where they are abundant has a high reputation, and used to be almost as popular as Horehound candy.
—Maud Grieve (Culinary Herbs & Condiments, 1934)

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When Wordsworth's heart with pleasure filled at a crowd of golden daffodils, it's a safe bet he didn't see them two weeks later.
—Geoff Hamilton

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Nature soon takes over if the gardener is absent.
—Penelope Hobhouse

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Nothing is a better lesson in the knowledge of plants than to sit down in front of them and look them over just as carefully as possible; and in no way can such study be more pleasantly or conveniently carried on than by taking a light seat to the rock-wall and giving plenty of time to each kind of little plant, examining it closely and asking oneself, and it, why this and why that?
—Gertrude Jekyll

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There is nothing like pruning a grapevine for training oneself to think like a plant.
—Hugh Johnson

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Fathers, instill in your children the garden-mania.
—Charles Joseph (Prince de Ligne, 1781)

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A grass-blade's no easier to make than an oak.
—James Russell Lowell

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Good gardening and a quiet life seldom go hand in hand.
—Christopher Lloyd

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The area of a handsome Garden may take up thirty or forty Acres, not more.
—Philip Miller (1724)

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"Green fingers" are a fact, and a mystery only to the unpracticed. But green fingers are the extensions of a verdant heart. A good garden cannot be made by somebody who has not developed the capacity to know and love growing things.
—Russell Page (The Education of a Gardener)

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Flowers...are richness enough in the garden picture. To add further ornamentation is to distract.
—Russell Page

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A little studied negligence is becoming to a garden.
—Eleanor Perenyi

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...a garden is like the self. It has so many layers and winding paths, real or imagined, that it can never be known, completely, even by the most intimate of friends.
—Anne Raver (American garden writer)

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Don't wear perfume in the garden—unless you want to be pollinated by bees.
—Anne Raver

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I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to.
—Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

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One day, the gardener realizes that what she is doing out there is actually teaching herself to garden by performing a series of experiments. This is a pivotal moment.
—Margaret Roach

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The true gardener must be brutal, and imaginative for the future.
—Vita Sackville-West

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It is unchristian to hedge from the sight of others the beauties of nature which it has been our good fortune to create or secure.
—Frank J. Scott (1870)

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Nothing is more completely the child of Art than a Garden.
—Sir Walter Scott

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Men are like plants—they never grow happily unless they are well cultivated.
—Charles-Louis de Secondat Montesquieu (1721)

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The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for him there.
—George Bernard Shaw

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My garden, with its silence and pulses of fragrance that come and go on the airy undulations, affects me like sweet music. Care stops at the gates, and gazes at me wistfully through the bars.
—Alexander Smith

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When one of my plants dies, I die a little inside, too.
—Linda Solegato

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Plants in pots are like animals in a zoo—they're totally dependent on their keepers.
—John Van de Water

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The man around the corner keeps experimenting with new flowers every year, and now has quite an extensive list of things he can't grow.
—William Vaughn

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I do not know the names of all the weeds and plants, I have to do as Adam did in his garden—name things as I find them.
—Charles Dudley Warner (1871)

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Plant carrots in January and you'll never have to eat carrots.
— author unknown

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The giant oak is an acorn that held its ground.
— author unknown

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There is material enough in a single flower for the ornament of a score of cathedrals.
—John Ruskin (1851)

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We sit in other people's gardens, why not in our own?
—Mirabel Osler

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Gardening, reading about gardening, and writing about gardening are all one; no one can garden alone.
—Elizabeth Lawrence

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Nature does not hesitate to interfere with me. So I do not hesitate to tamper with it.
—Henry Mitchell

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Love your neighbor, yet pull not down your hedge.
—George Herbert (1640)

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I suppose that for most people one of the darker joys of gardening is that once you've got started it's not at all hard to find someone who knows a little bit less than you.
—Allen Lacy

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Gardening is civil and social, but wants the vigor and freedom of the forest and the outlaw.
—Henry David Thoreau (1862)

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To create a little flower is the labour of ages.
—William Blake (1793)

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Gardening seems an easy art, for infinitude is almost as well suggested in a small plot as a large one.
—Robert Harbison

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A garden should always look bigger than it really is.
—Alexander le Blond (1712)

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Gardening gives one back a sense of proportion about everything—except itself.
—May Sarton

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Nature abhors a garden.
—Michael Pollan

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A garden was the primitive prison, till man, with Promethean felicity and boldness, luckily sinned himself out of it.
—Charles Lamb (1830)

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The very statement that there is but one way to make a garden is its own refutation.
—William Robinson

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The rules of garden are the rules of art; the rules of the rock-garden are the more and awful rules of Nature herself.
—Reginald Farrer

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We learn from our gardens to deal with the most urgent question of the time: How much is enough?
—Wendell Berry

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When we save seeds, we are taking history into our own hands. Literally, holding a seed is holding a story that stretches back, sometimes centuries. It's a story that conjures up over-the-fence seed swaps. It's a story that speaks to beating the odds, to adaptation and evolution, to finding a niche and holding on tight, just the way a bean tendril does. Seeds also speak of the future, of those untold, unfolded stories, the ones that you and I are shaping this very moment.
—Rebecca Pastor

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My gardening will never make me famous.
I'm a horticultural ignoramus,
I can't tell a string bean from a soy bean,
or even a girl bean from a boy bean.
—Ogden Nash

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Flowers really do intoxicate me.
—Vita Sackville-West

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I must ally myself with my soil; study and help it to the utmost, untiringly... Always, the soil must come first.
—Marion Cran

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.
—Marcus Tullius Cicero

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The most noteworthy thing about gardeners is that they are always optimistic, always enterprising, and never satisfied. They always look forward to doing better than they have ever done before.
—Vita Sackville-West

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    Book of Days

An Unthymely Death

Death Come Quickly

Widow's Tears

Cat's Claw

Mourning Gloria

Holly Blues

Wormwood

Nightshade

Spanish Dagger

Bleeding Hearts

Dead Man's Bones

A Dilly of a Death

Indigo Dying

Bloodroot

Mistletoe Man

Lavender Lies

Chile Death

Love Lies Bleeding

Rueful Death

Rosemary Remembered

Hangman's Root

Witches' Bane

Thyme of Death




Read more about China Bayles' Book of Days, Susan's herbal daybook, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about An Unthymely Death, a collection of ten China Bayles short stories, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Thyme of Death, Susan's first China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Witches' Bane, Susan's second China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Hangman's Root, Susan's third China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Rosemary Remembered, Susan's fourth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Rueful Death, Susan's fifth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Love Lies Bleeding, Susan's sixth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Chile Death, Susan's seventh China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Lavender Lies, Susan's eighth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Mistletoe Man, Susan's ninth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Bloodroot, Susan's tenth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Indigo Dying, Susan's eleventh China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Dilly of a Death, Susan's twelfth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Dead Man's Bones, Susan's thirteenth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Bleeding Hearts, Susan's fourteenth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Spanish Dagger, Susan's fifteenth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Nightshade, Susan's sixteenth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Wormwood, Susan's seventeenth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Holly Blues, Susan's eighteenth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Mourning Gloria, Susan's nineteenth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Cat's Claw, Susan's twentieth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Widow's Tears, Susan's twenty-first China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Death Come Quickly, Susan's twenty-second China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Bittersweet, Susan's twenty-third China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Blood Orange, Susan's twenty-fourth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Last Chance Olive Ranch, Susan's twenty-fifth China Bayles mystery, by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about An Extraordinary Year of Ordinary Days by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Together, Alone by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Writing From Life by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Work of Her Own by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Starting Points by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about What Wildness is This by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about With Courage and Common Sense by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about Loving Eleanor by clicking on the book cover.
Read more about A Wilder Rose by clicking on the book cover.